Build Over Agreements Prior To 2011

It is almost impossible to obtain information from the water service to confirm whether the building permit should have been issued or whether the sewers were previously private and were transferred following the transfer of the private canals regulation in 2011. This makes it difficult to satisfy a commercial lender that was not necessary to reach an agreement. A commercial lender must ensure that, in a situation where a sewer contractor needs access to a sewerage system located under land, the work does not affect the value of the property and the security of the bank, and there must be some certainty as to the liability of a legal minor to repair the damage in the absence of a formal construction agreement. The transmission of private pipes has generally been beneficial to both the public and water companies. It relieved public opinion of the responsibility for sewers and entrusted them exclusively to the water companies, which were much better equipped for the maintenance of the sewerage system. While confusion persists on issues such as sewer construction, there is no doubt that homeowners are ultimately better protected than before the installation. All water companies have legal rights to access public sewers on private land. These include sewers located under or near a property. If the construction permit has been granted by a canal, Severn Trent will still attempt to reach the canal without disturbing the terrain. If this is unavoidable, they will repair all the damage done in reason. If a canal has been built without consent, Severn Trent has the right to reach and protect sewers by any means they deem appropriate.

In extreme circumstances, this may include the requirement that all buildings involving public sewers be modified or removed at the expense of the homeowner. It would not have been necessary to obtain a building permit from the wastewater butcher if the sewers were private. In the event of non-compliance with the building permit for construction projects, the municipality is entitled to the examination and, if the works do not comply with the building rules, it must notify a notice in accordance with Section 36 of the Construction Act 1984 (BA 1984) which obliges the owner of the house (who may not be the same person who complies with the construction contract) to rectify or , if this was not possible, return the property to its former state.