U.s. International Social Security Agreements

A general misunderstanding about the U.S. agreements is that they allow doubly covered workers or their employers to choose the system to which they will contribute. This is not the case. In addition, the agreements do not alter the basic rules for covering the social security legislation of the participating countries, such as. B those that define covered income or covered work. They exempt workers from coverage under the scheme of either country only if, otherwise, their work was covered by both schemes. The first international agreement in the field of social security was concluded in 1827 between the Grand Duchy of Parma and France. Although the agreements with Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Japan do not use the residence rule as the primary determinant of coverage of self-employment, each of them contains a provision guaranteeing that workers are insured and taxed in only one country. For more information on these agreements, click here on our website or by writing to the Social Security Administration (SSA) in the “Conclusion” section below.

If you have any questions about international social security conventions, call the Social Security Administration`s Office of International Programs at 410-965-3322 or 410-965-7306. However, please do not call these numbers if you wish to inquire about an individual entitlement to benefits. Agreements to coordinate social security across national borders have been commonplace in Western Europe for decades. International social security agreements are beneficial both for those who are currently working and for those whose careers have ended. For current workers, the agreements remove double contributions that they might otherwise make to the social security plans of the United States and another country. .